Patti Warashina

Patti Warashina was born in Spokane, Washington in 1940. She After going to college in Seattle and receiving her Bachelor’s, she went on to receive her Master of Fine Art in 1964 at the University of Washington. During these years she studied with artists Shinsaku and Shoji Hamada, Rudy Autio, Harold Myers, Ruth Penington and Robert Sperry. Warashina has received numerous awards and honors throughout the years. She’s taught over 30 years and can be found in museum collections world-wide including the Museum of Art & Design in New York City, the Seattle Art Museum, the Tacoma Art Museum, Henry Art Gallery, Seattle, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Smithsonian’s American Art Museum, Renwick Gallery, Washington DC, the Art Gallery of Western Australia in Perth, Ichon World Ceramic Center in South Korea and Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art.

“The human figure has been an absorbing visual fascination in my work. I use the figure in voyeuristic situations in which irony, humor, absurdities portray human behavior as a relief from society’s pressure and frustrations on mankind. At times, I use the figure in complex arrangements so that it will be seethingly alive. I like the visual stimulation of portraying human energy, as a way to compare it to any biological organization found in nature. – Patti Warashina”

Patti Warashina was born in Spokane, Washington in 1940. She After going to college in Seattle and receiving her Bachelor’s, she went on to receive her Master of Fine Art in 1964 at the University of Washington. During these years she studied with artists Shinsaku and Shoji Hamada, Rudy Autio, Harold Myers, Ruth Penington and Robert Sperry. Warashina has received numerous awards and honors throughout the years. She’s taught over 30 years and can be found in museum collections world-wide including the Museum of Art & Design in New York City, the Seattle Art Museum, the Tacoma Art Museum, Henry Art Gallery, Seattle, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Smithsonian’s American Art Museum, Renwick Gallery, Washington DC, the Art Gallery of Western Australia in Perth, Ichon World Ceramic Center in South Korea and Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art.

“The human figure has been an absorbing visual fascination in my work. I use the figure in voyeuristic situations in which irony, humor, absurdities portray human behavior as a relief from society’s pressure and frustrations on mankind. At times, I use the figure in complex arrangements so that it will be seethingly alive. I like the visual stimulation of portraying human energy, as a way to compare it to any biological organization found in nature. – Patti Warashina”

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