Ross Richmond

Ross Richmond Biography

Ross Richmond started working with glass at the Cleveland Institute of Art in 1991. He graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Art with a major in Glass and a minor in Metals. Ross has studied and taught at the Penland School of Craft and the Pilchuck Glass School. In 1997 Richmond began working as an apprentice to William Morris and became a member of his team in 1999.

Ross Richmond’s pieces are typically narrative. He works mainly with figurative elements and symbolic objects. Richmond teaches in the US and Canada. Ross is considered one of the top glass sculptors in the field today. He has worked with (and for) some of the greatest glass and non-glass artists. They include William Morris, Jane Rosen, Preston Singletary, KeKe Cribbs, and Dale Chihuly.

“Much of my current work is influenced by man’s relationship with nature, as well as his impact upon nature. I find faces and hands to be very beautiful and expressionistic, a source of silent communication, and I use gestures and titles to help convey an overall story. My pieces are usually about communication with self or between others.” – Ross Richmond

Ross Richmond Biography

Ross Richmond started working with glass at the Cleveland Institute of Art in 1991. He graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Art with a major in Glass and a minor in Metals. Ross has studied and taught at the Penland School of Craft and the Pilchuck Glass School. In 1997 Richmond began working as an apprentice to William Morris and became a member of his team in 1999.

Ross Richmond’s pieces are typically narrative. He works mainly with figurative elements and symbolic objects. Richmond teaches in the US and Canada. Ross is considered one of the top glass sculptors in the field today. He has worked with (and for) some of the greatest glass and non-glass artists. They include William Morris, Jane Rosen, Preston Singletary, KeKe Cribbs, and Dale Chihuly.

“Much of my current work is influenced by man’s relationship with nature, as well as his impact upon nature. I find faces and hands to be very beautiful and expressionistic, a source of silent communication, and I use gestures and titles to help convey an overall story. My pieces are usually about communication with self or between others.” – Ross Richmond

Read Less...

For information on more available work from this artist, please contact us.